• Announcements,  Books,  Creative Writing 101,  Indie Author Life,  Mechanics,  Novels,  Writing Journey

    Writing Multiple Point of Views + Winter’s Siren Release Day!

    Given how WINTER’S SIREN (out today!!) has two POVs, I’ve been thinking about how dual POV stories differ from single and other multiple POV stories. In 2011, I was working on a story that had four POVs and for some reason I thought a fifth POV was a good idea for two scenes. Ugh. Old me. HAHA. Anywho, two of the POVs took place in the past – everything was supposed to connect later in book two (again, ugh, old me!) – but I ended every one of those past POVs on a cliffhanger. Namely because I was breaking a complete story up into pieces. It would have been much…

  • Facts of Life,  Mechanics

    So This One Time, On YouTube…

    Have you ever been reading a book and realized that two themes in the book are completely contradicting each other? For example, some chick is claiming she doesn’t believe in love, but she still goes on a thousand dates a week anyway? Not to prove herself right or even wrong, mind you, but because she’s genuinely hoping she’ll find love if she keeps trying, you know, that thing she doesn’t believe in. So I’m browsing YouTube one day, and I see this video where this girl shaves her head completely bald. And I was curious. I wanted to know¬†why she was shaving off all her gorgeous hair. She said it…

  • Mechanics,  Writing World

    The Great Description Debate

    It seems like there are some posts that come up a dozen times a month on the writing boards: prologues, description, writing rules, the best POV to write in. There is no right answer for any of these things. The most successful¬†authors in the world break all the “rules” for example (Stephen King), have prologues (Dan Brown), have books with three page descriptions of button down shirts (I’m looking at YOU, Anne Rice.) Some people, like myself, LOVE description. Not the four page shirt kind, but the “he had orange eyes” kind. Orange eyes…that’s interesting. Anywho, the people who claim they hate description forget that 90% of the novel is…

  • Characters,  Closet Mad Scientist,  Mechanics

    The Science of Interesting Characters

    Or why I interview my characters as part of the planning process. One day I was trying to figure out what made some of my characters more interesting than others. To help me figure out how the character’s ticked, I embarked on a snowball experiment. It’s not as fancy as it sounds. I literally threw snowballs at some of my characters. Here’s what transpired… Reagan: Started a full-fledged snowball war, complete with side-splitting laughter on both sides. Adria: Laughed at the notion that anyone would have the guts to throw a snowball at her. Felix: Laughed when it hit him, assuming it was some child who threw it at him.…

  • Tips,  Writer's Block

    Avoiding Brick Walls & Unraveling Plot Lines

    You just got a great idea! Whoo Hoo! But how do you keep this idea from giving you the worst of headaches along the way or worse, ending up in the graveyard of story ideas never to see the light of day again? These are the Questions you must be able to answer: Who?What?When?Where?HOW?WHY? Why is how and why in all caps? Because they are the questions that will come up repeatedly as you map out the plot either in your head or on paper. When you come to a crossroads or a brick wall in your story, it’s usually one of these two questions that you need to answer…